Why you should research your destination's history before you go

Why you should research your destination’s history before you go (Travel Tip Tuesday #6)

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In this week’s Travel Tip Tuesday post we are talking about history! Learn why you should always research you destination’s history before you go on your next business trip!

While we tend to focus on business travel here at the CBoardingGroup, this tip applies to leisure travel too!

Learn the “Story” before you go!

Frequent business travelers have a tendency to want to move fast. We are usually on the go and trying to get to our destination and then get back. However, a few years back (and after struggling to not be bored on my trips) I employed a new technique: I started researching the area’s history before I get there.

Wikipedia is your friend here. Let’s say I am visiting Minot, ND (which I have by the way). A quick glance let’s me know this city is called the Magic City and that Al Capone’s gang was involved in bootlegging back in Prohibition. Fascinating stuff.

Minot

During my visit to Minot we were stopped by policeman who’d blocked off the road to our hotel. Apparently there was a crazy homeless guy that’d climbed on top of a metal bridge and was threatening to jump (it was like 20 feet so not exactly Mt Everest). The sign on the bridge? “Welcome to Magic City.”

Made for some good jokes about the Magic stuff this fella was smoking.

I always try to learn a bit more about the place I am visiting whenever possible. It makes the experience a little richer and you never know what you might find. Occasionally you might find yourself next to some really interesting “it happened here” kind of stuff.

For example, did you know that the capitol of Salem Oregon (which is an AMAZING piece of architectural beauty) is actually the 3rd capitol building built in Oregon? The first two burnt down. You can read all about things to do in Salem Oregon here.

Or, that Brad Parscale, the campaign manager for the Trump 2020 campaign is from Topeka, KS?

How about that fact that the Calico Ghost Town is a short drive from Barstow (a horrible city, btw)?

So…on your next trip, slow down a bit, do a little research on your destination and have a richer experience.

Check out all of our destination stories here

Until We Meet Again (which will be next Tuesday…)

What’s the coolest place you visited for work? Join the conversation by leaving a comment or hitting us on social media via Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Travel Tip Tuesday Learn the History of your destination first
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Author Biography

We. Do. Business Travel. The CBoardingGroup.com is a leading business travel focused travel blog. The principal author has over 18 years of consistent & frequent business travel. Over the years, he has developed various travel habits, travel tips, advice and more that he shares with fellow travelers of all skill levels. From hotel life, to airplane tips, to the weekly grind of frequent travel, plus a little travel humor, this blog is a haven for business travelers. Read his full bio here.

Advertiser Disclosure: CBoardingGroup has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. CBoardingGroup and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author's alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. “Responses are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.”

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