REAL ID for flying when is it needed

REAL ID for flying – when is it needed?

Advertiser Disclosure: CBoardingGroup has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. CBoardingGroup and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author's alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may also earn commissions from other affiliate programs as applicable. See our privacy & disclosure page for more info

The clock is ticking for travelers to update their government issued driver’s license to a REAL ID compliant ID. However many travelers are confused about what a REAL ID is, how to get a REAL ID and the specifics of when travelers need a REAL ID for flying.

Fear not, traveler. We’ve got your back. In this Guide to the REAL ID Program we answer all of your burning questions about this new identification including:

  • What is a REAL ID?
  • When do travelers need the REAL ID for flying?
  • Is the REAL ID a separate and new form of Federal ID?
  • How do I know I have a REAL ID?
  • How much does a REAL ID cost?
  • Can I use something other than a REAL ID for travel?
  • Does everyone need a real ID by 2020?
  • Can I use a passport instead of real ID?
  • Can I use Global Entry as real ID?
  • Is Real ID mandatory?
  • What is the REAL ID Act?

Before we answer the burning question of when travelers need the REAL ID for flying let’s reorient ourselves to the REAL ID and the REAL ID Act of 2005.

What is a REAL ID?

The REAL ID Act of 2005 established minimum standards for Driver’s Licenses and ID cards accepted by Federal agencies for official purposes. The law is the result of a recommendation from the 9/11 Commission to improve the strength of state-issued identification cards that Federal agencies can accept as valid forms of ID.

Specifically, REAL ID compliant ID cards will be required for certain types of Federally governed activities or for accessing Federal facilities including:

  • Boarding commercial aircraft
  • Entering nuclear power plants
  • Accessing Federal facilities

Federal Agencies, State ID issuing agencies and citizens must comply with the REAL ID Act by October 1 2020.

For travelers, this means that you must have a REAL ID compliant ID card (typically a driver’s license) in order to travel on or after October 1, 2020. Or, another form of TSA approved ID (like a passport or Global Entry Card, or if in the military, a military ID).

For more information on REAL ID and the TSA, please watch this TSA video:

When do travelers need the REAL ID for flying?

REAL ID compliant ID cards will be required when flying commercial aircraft starting October 1, 2020. Travelers in possession of other forms of acceptable ID (like a current passport) can pass through TSA without a REAL ID compliant drivers license.

Is the REAL ID a separate and new form of Federal ID?

No, the REAL ID is not a separate and new form of Federal ID (or “national ID card”). Instead, state-issued driver’s licenses must be REAL ID compliant. States, who issue driver’s licenses, must update their issuing standards to be compliant with the REAL ID Act so that residents can obtain a new ID card.

To be clear, the REAL ID is NOT a new and separate ID card issued by the Federal government in addition to your existing driver’s license. It will, however, require citizens to obtain a new state-issued REAL ID compliant driver’s license.

How do I know I have a REAL ID?

REAL ID compliant ID cards are clearly marked with a star at the top of the ID card.

How do I get a REAL ID?

You can obtain a REAL ID compliant drivers license through your state’s driver’s license issuing agency. Applicants will need to provide documentation showing:

  • Full Legal Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Social Security Number
  • Two Proofs of Principal Address
  • Proof of Lawful Status

When in doubt consult your state’s driver’s license issuing agency for more details.

Given that obtaining a REAL ID must be done in person travelers are encouraged to start their REAL ID application process as soon as possible. During the preparation of this article I started my application (January 3rd 2020) and the earliest appointment I could get (at my second choice of CA DMV locations) was March 13th. OUCH.

How much does a REAL ID cost?

The cost of obtaining a REAL ID will vary by state. For example, in CA a REAL ID will costs $35. In NY a REAL ID costs $65. Consult your state’s driver’s license issuing agency’s website.

Can I use something other than a REAL ID for Flying?

Yes, the TSA will accept other forms of ID in place of a REAL ID including a passport, military ID, and even a Global Entry card. Consult the TSA for a full list of approved forms of ID.

Exceptions to the REAL ID policy for New York, Michigan, Minnesota and Vermont

The TSA’s website notes this about the REAL ID program and New York, Michigan, Minnesota and Vermont:

Michigan, Vermont, Minnesota, and New York states issue REAL ID and state-issued enhanced driver’s licenses, both of which are acceptable. Washington state issues enhanced driver’s licenses only. State-issued enhanced driver’s licenses are marked with a flag. These documents will be accepted at the airport security checkpoint when the REAL ID enforcement goes into effect.” Ref: tsa.gov/real-id

Example of the EDL vs REAL ID vs Standard ID from New York are noted below in an image from the NY State DMV.

Does everyone need a real ID by 2020?

Currently, REAL IDs will only be required to access Federal facilities, fly commercial air, and enter nuclear facilities. If none of these activities are planned an individual could theoretically avoid getting a REAL ID for some period of time. It’s suspected that other entities (e.g. State Agencies) may require REAL ID compliant driver’s licenses for state-related activities at some point in the future.

Its worth noting that other forms of TSA approved IDs (like a Global Entry Card or Passport or Military ID) could potentially be used in place of a REAL ID.

Can I use a passport instead of REAL ID for flying?

A passport is a TSA approved form of ID and can be used in place of a REAL ID for flying domestically. Travelers who may not have passports and are flying domestically would still need to get a REAL ID or a passport (or some other form of approved ID).

Can I use Global Entry as REAL ID?

A Global Entry card, according to the TSA, is an approved form of ID. Thus, it could be used in place of a REAL ID when traveling.

Is Real ID mandatory?

REAL ID compliant IDs will be mandatory for people who wish to enter a Federal facility, fly commercial air or enter a nuclear facility. If a person intends to do any of this (and does not have a form of alternative ID) then the REAL ID is mandatory.

The REAL ID for Travel is coming…are you ready?

The REAL ID is coming…best to get ahead of it knock our your replacement ID as soon as possible. If you have travel plans for on or after October 1, 2020 a REAL ID will be required, so don’t delay!

Thanks for visiting and don’t forget to follow us on social media including: Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, Flipboard and Instagram. Be sure to check out some of our other great travel related content including the following articles:

Pin Me for Later:

EVERYTHING you need to know about traveling with a Real ID
REAL ID for flying - when is it needed
  •  
    6
    Shares
  • 6
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Author Biography

We. Do. Business Travel. The CBoardingGroup.com is a leading business travel focused travel blog. The principal author has over 18 years of consistent & frequent business travel. Over the years, he has developed various travel habits, travel tips, advice and more that he shares with fellow travelers of all skill levels. From hotel life, to airplane tips, to the weekly grind of frequent travel, plus a little travel humor, this blog is a haven for business travelers. Read his full bio here.

Advertiser Disclosure: CBoardingGroup has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. CBoardingGroup and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author's alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. “Responses are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.”

10 comments on “REAL ID for flying – when is it needed?

  1. David

    A passport is a perfectly valid substitute for real ID, as are permanent residence cards for the purposes of flying. Either a US or foreign country issued passport will be accepted by TSA in order to board an aircraft, provided of course, their still “in date”.
    In California for example if you’re in possession of the above documents, they dont recommend you rush to apply until those documents have or are about to expire. Provided you have some current form of state identification.

    Reply
  2. Robert McKenzie

    It appears you have been given a bad information source, or possibly used an uninformed opinion, for a couple answers in your blog:

    — “Can I use a passport instead of REAL ID for flying? No, a passport is not an acceptable replacement for a REAL ID nor can passports be REAL ID compliant.” ***This answer is incorrect. Per both the Department of State and the TSA websites, a Passport (both book and card versions) may be used as REAL ID, see https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passports/need-passport/card.html and/or https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/identification ***

    — “Can I use Global Entry as REAL ID? No, a Global Entry card is not a valid replacement for a REAL ID. ” ***This answer is incorrect. Global Entry cards are indeed on the ‘approved’ list, per the TSA website. See https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/identification ***

    Reply
  3. Ric

    News reports lately in California indicate that some US passports are not scanning correctly at the CA DMV. The State Department is aware of this problem. CA DMV is suggesting that applicants also bring original or notarized copies of birth certificates if they plan to bring passports to the appointments just in case. Obviously, if the applicant travels internationally and has Global Entry – their passports will scan correctly – but we ARE talking DMV here !

    Reply
  4. James

    Wow, the author thought the passport wasn’t a valid ID for flying?

    Anyway, the real question is “why” we need real ID.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.